Both Mike and I have been playing fantasy baseball forever, but we have yet to join any dynasty leagues.  This year, we found a promising startup and will be blogging all year long about our rookie season as we share a team.


In developing the rules for this league, there were some easy decisions, some hard decisions, and of course, the decisions that just got made. The league setup that we have provided is largely in place. It comes from a few different leagues and experiences that lent themselves into the creation.
  • 16-team, head-to-head format.
  • OttoNeu styled points scoring system.
  • Dynasty league, 30-man active roster plus a 15-man minor league (that grows by 5 each off-season) roster.
  • Live major league auction draft, separate minor league draft.
  • Higher stakes, two year commitment to start using LeagueSafe.
Payouts for regular season finishes and post-season finishes.
Daily communication, chatter and camaraderie.
A challenging yet fun atmosphere.

The first episode of many Dynasty Grinders chats. Jordan and Andrew get together to talk about the format and rules of the league. As the league begins to get started, it’s your chance to get in at the very beginning.



We are aiming for some lofty goals, but we come by them honestly. We’re open for any kinds of communication and while the rules are set, some pieces are open for discussion prior to our beginning.


Pre-Auction Valuation of Players

It is fairly commonplace now days to have a multitude of resources that help you compete in fantasy sports. Whether you use magazines, subscription websites or various crowd sourcing tools, there is usually little problem in drawing what a player’s value will be in any fantasy league.

Dynasty Grinders is not different enough to make those types of tools useless. Quite the opposite, I believe in having more information to gather to draw my conclusions. The crowd definitely has information for you to draw from.

That being said, there are differences. Dynasty Grinders is a head to head, points based scoring, dynasty fantasy baseball league. It is similar to FanGraphs‘s version of Ottoneu, but different. We have a larger budget, draft different positions, more players. It is similar to standard dynasty leagues, but different, mostly because we are not roto.



Opportunity Costs - Platoons and the Elite Tier

In all familiar with the fact that, in general, baseball teams have 27 outs to spend in any given game. Managers send out their players in what they believe will give the most return (in runs scored and runs prevented) on any given day in return for those 27 outs. Simple game.

Dynasty Grinders has its own out-like currency. Each week you have 10 hitter positions that could be filled each day. You also can fill three relief pitcher slots each day. Starting pitchers work a bit different, as you can only use seven starts each week, you have days with one or as many as five.

MLB managers get the benefit of knowing they will have an opportunity to use all 27 outs. In head-to-head weekly fantasy, we don’t get that benefit. We have to deal with off-days, rain outs, day games, player rest days, and surprise injuries among others.

Continue reading on DynastyGrinders.com


Pitching Platoons

One of the things that makes Dynasty Grinders unique — and challenging — is our seven start per week limit on pitchers.

There are a couple key reasons this rule is in place to begin with. First, it prevents teams in our head-to-head format from having clear volume advantages. If my team happens to have 15 starters going this week and yours only has seven, you’re at a distinct competitive disadvantage and in deep leagues, you can’t simply pick up good — or even adequate — talent* and hope to keep up.

* This isn’t a universal truth. You’ll probably be able to find serviceable guys in free agency. But if you find yourself in a week where your seventh start depends on it, good luck.



Injury Prone Players

Oh the ballad of Troy Tulowitzki and Giancarlo Stanton. Could you guys just play a full season and stay healthy the whole time, please?

Easier said than done, baseball is a hard sport to play and some players seem to be more prone to not being able to play the long season as well as everyone else. With that in mind, that doesn’t mean that these kinds of players have lost all value.

In fact these players have quite a bit of value yet. It hurts so bad when they get hurt, because typically they’re quite great when they’re healthy. So what’s their value? You have two parts greatness, one part injury concern, and one part luck. When drafting Stanton or Tulo, you’re taking a risk. They’re great players, but are you getting 140 games played?